Topic | Trinity (Persons of)

Posts Categorized: Trinity (Persons of)

Confident World-Changing Prayer

By in Highlands Blog on

Prayers that Get to Heaven There are many prayers that only make it as far as the ceiling; they don’t make it to heaven and so they have no effect on the world. But in Ephesians 1, the Apostle Paul is absolutely confident that his prayers are not like that. He believes that his prayers are heard in heaven and he expects the world to be changed as his prayers are answered. So what gives him that confidence? Paul’s confidence in prayer is grounded on the truths about Jesus in Ephesians 1: 19–23, since Jesus has ascended to heaven, your. . .
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Know Who Your Boss Is {A Girl’s Guide to the Good Life}

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No matter how independent we imagine ourselves, we are not. Before we can toddle about on our own two feet, our hearts (if not our lips) impetuously bawl, “You’re not the boss of me!” to anyone with the audacity to order us about. Unfortunately, infantile outbursts against rightful authority are not outgrown as quickly as a two-year-old stretches the limits of her toddler clothes. When last season’s footie jammies are pulled out of storage it’s obvious they need to go, but we continue trying to outfit ourselves with positions of independence and autonomy refusing to acknowledge that no matter how. . .
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I Have Overcome the World

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Jesus has left the building . . . and that’s a good thing. I know that those two statements don’t seem to go together but that is basically what Jesus is saying to the disciples in what is commonly called the “Farewell Discourse” found in the Gospel of John, chapters 13–16. A Troubling Announcement In these chapters, Jesus isn’t healing anyone or speaking to the crowds or contending with the church leaders; He is spending the last hours of His earthly time with that rag-a-muffin band made up mostly of blue-collar men who have followed Him for three years and. . .
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Don’t Confuse the Bread with the Plate it Comes On

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Disagreeable Compliments As Christians, when we think about our faith or our worship, we often sink into thoughts or discussions about secondary doctrines or modes of worship. While there is surely a time and place for those discussions, I have been a bit dismayed of late with the relative proportion that is spent on what I would consider tertiary topics, or points of debate that are less than central. I have heard it said far too often (and sadly said it myself) when referring to a pastor or teacher, the constant self-protective caveat of “You know, I don’t agree with. . .
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Jesus Wants You Dead

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Christianity is Harmful Christianity harms women by teaching wives to submit to husbands. Christianity harms children by brainwashing them into a closed-minded system of beliefs. Christianity harms people by setting forth oppressive standards for sexual activity that result in crippling guilt when those standards go unmet. Christianity harms people who identify as gay or transgender by demanding that they change something intrinsic to their self-understanding. Christianity harms society by asserting a fundamental distinction between the saved and the lost, the righteous and the ungodly. And if this were not enough, Christianity is down in the basement right now, boiling and. . .
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Seeing God in All Things

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Enjoying God’s Gifts God has given us good things in the world and not only for their base use. Food is a gift that serves our needs far more than for basic survival. We have food in all its varieties, colors, and flavors to see that God is good and gives us good things. The sun does many things for us, but to only see the thing in the sky that provides light is to only see the sun. The sun is bright, large, and powerful, for us to see the majesty and glory of the Triune God. God gives us. . .
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Does God Keep His Promises?

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The Tension of the Story Any author will tell you that a good story needs certain elements to work, to bring in and keep a reader engaged. One of the most critical elements is a sense of tension, something that is not quite right that must be resolved at some point. Even the writers of the Hardy Boys or Nancy Drew mystery books knew this. Besides the main plot, there was always some sense of tension at the end of each chapter that kept you reading—just one more chapter. This principle doesn’t only apply to fiction. The greatest story of. . .
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Is God a Stick-in-the-Mud?

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The next time you hear anyone describing God by that longstanding caricature of someone who, upon finding people having fun, tells them to stop, remind them that mankind started with a naked man and a naked woman with an entire world to romp and play in and that that was God’s idea. And when you do have that opportunity for such a rebuttal, I hope that it is on a crowded airplane or a long checkout line at the grocery store. We are Ungrateful Now, you may have to concede right then and there that such a critique can be. . .
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Jesus Messed Up My Life

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The Neat & Tidy Life I think it was soon after reading Discipline, the Glad Surrender and Ordering Your Private World that I developed the mistaken assumption that Jesus came to make my life neat and tidy. If I was a really good Christian I would follow a schedule, have a daily quiet time, keep up on all household chores, be perfectly consistent in disciplining the children, and always balance work, rest, and play. Perhaps I was the only one living under these assumptions, but I think that some of these ideas are a reflection of our Western and American. . .
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God is Scary Beautiful

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God is Scary Beautiful

When God’s Beauty Seems Ugly The problem with God’s beauty is that it often seems so ugly. Not the nice Bible verses, of course. The beauty of holiness—that has an attractive ring to it. We’d like God’s beauty to establish the works of our hands. “One thing I have desired of the Lord, that will I seek: that I may dwell in the house of the Lord all the days of my life, to behold the beauty of the Lord” (Psalm 27:4). Yes, yes, let’s cross-stitch this (plus lambs and flowers) and frame it. Wait. There’s more. Mountains and men. . .
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My Dad Could Do Magic!

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My Dad Could Do Magic Really. He could. At least through the eyes of a little boy, he could. I’m not talking about divination, which is an abomination. I’m talking about magic. When I was nine or ten, my dad bought a 1956 Cadillac Fleetwood. It was dark green, and was absolutely beautiful. It was as big as a small apartment, and had every option and gadget that was available at the time—but no seat belts. One day, I was sitting in the front seat next to my dad, along with one of my friends. Dad casually said, “Wanna see. . .
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God is Not Zoltar

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God is not a Zoltar fortune teller. (photo credit: Mark Kaletka @flickr)

Getting Your Fortune Told Back in the days when pinball was popular, video games were in their infancy, and you had to go to arcades to play either one, there was one machine that stood out as unique. It had a major role in the Tom Hanks film Big. It was Zoltar, the fortune teller machine. You can actually buy one of the machines today for around ten thousand bucks. You stick in a coin, Zoltar’s eyes light up, and the machine spits out a card with your fortune. God Isn’t Zoltar It’s sadly common that we approach the task. . .
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Talking God With Your Kids

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We were driving along, the family and I, when the discussion somehow transitioned into a question from my son, Ethan: “Dad, is there a word for all of the ‘omnis’ associated with God?” Now please be aware that, though that is an important and an amazing question, our family really isn’t that intellectual. In fact, I am pretty sure that the previous chatter included movie storylines, a question about lunch, and a smidgen of gossip. How did we get to theology? Your guess is as good as mine. Anyway, there it was, a very big question. If your family is. . .
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I Am Who I Am

By in Highlands Fellow on

I Am Who I Am

Reflecting His Image I remember an occasion when I was trying to find my way around in a dark room where only faint shadows could be discerned. As I turned a corner, I realized I was not alone. I could barely make out an outline that looked like another person. With a heart-pounding adrenaline surge, I reached for the switch and turned on the lights. When the illumination revealed the secrets of the darkness, I found that the person I saw was me. I had seen a reflection of myself in the mirror on the wall. Image-reflecting is what mirrors. . .
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The Fearing Father

By in Highlands Fellow on

The Fearing Father

I have been a father now for twenty nine years. God has blessed my wife and me with ten children. And I am thankful that by God’s grace each one of my children has professed faith in Jesus Christ. And those who are now married are now raising their children to love the Lord, to be recipients of His grace, to cry out for His mercy. And I am humbled when I remember how God has used me as an instrument in bringing the reality of faith in their lives. Fatherhood is Not for Wimps You see, fatherhood is not. . .
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Ask Paul and R.C.: Why Do Christians Still Sin?

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Dr. Sproul recently gave a sermon on Romans 7: 15-20 and tries to answer the question: Why Do Christians Still Sin? Listen here. 15 For I do not understand my own actions. For I do not do what I want, but I do the very thing I hate. 16 Now if I do what I do not want, I agree with the law, that it is good. 17 So now it is no longer I who do it, but sin that dwells within me. 18 For I know that nothing good dwells in me, that is, in my flesh. For I have the desire to do what. . .
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Gardening and THE Gardener

By in Highlands Fellow on

Learning from Our Garden It is early May here in the Appalachians, in southwest Virginia. Everything is green. The lawn is mowed twice, could have been thrice, already. When you live in the wilderness every year is partially taken with chopping, hewing, burning the ever accumulating vegetation that abounds faster than you can whack it down. There is enough winter here to stop the machine for a few months, but by mid-March the weedy bounty has come to full bloom. We have a large greenhouse about twenty-five yards from the house, and some raised beds up on the hill above.. . .
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Baby Jesus — Mysteries of Christmas

By in Highlands Fellow on

Mystery of the Incarnation With Christmas now at hand, our hearts are naturally turned toward the mystery and wonder of Jesus. I say mystery and wonder because everywhere I look in Scripture the writing about the incarnation is revealing, and yet shrouded where we cannot penetrate, or, at least defies full understanding. Jesus told us He is our brother and our friend. Because of those assurances we sometimes forget He remains the King of the universe. He is the mighty warrior who rides a white horse to victory in Revelation, or is predicted to arrive with hosts of angels. He. . .
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The Spirit of Christmas Future

By in Highlands Fellow on

It’s too bad that Dickens’ old Scrooge is remembered in terms of “bah, humbug.” I mean, after all he did change, and his latter end was night and day compared to his rough start. I can say the same for myself… In fact, even David prayed that the Lord would not remember the sins of his youth (Ps. 25). Of course, we could say it took some extreme measures in Scrooge’s case, nighttime messengers and all. But wait–didn’t you and I experience messengers of a sort? Yes, the Holy Spirit was involved, but weren’t there some “beautiful feet” as well,. . .
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