Tag Archives | Idolatry

Posts Tagged: Idolatry

Your Idols Usually Look Like You

By in Highlands Blog on

Your Idols Usually Look Like You

What does idolatry look like? As a sin, idolatry usually brings certain concepts or images (no pun intended) to mind. We typically think about statues and pictures as objects of our worship, and that is entirely accurate, though it doesn’t cover it completely. As I’ve said before in sermons, if you think little Buddhas or icons are your only worry with regards to this commandment, you’re reading it wrong. As we meditate on the sin a little deeper, we move into areas such as attitudes, insecurities, possessions, and whacked out priorities, that gain sinful traction and preeminence in our lives.. . .
Read more »

Man in the Mirror — Living Up to the Ideal

By in Highlands Fellow on

Man in the Mirror — Living Up to the Ideal

I had an encounter recently with my chief nemesis. He is well known to me and some of you have had occasion to meet him. He is not my favorite guy but he is always challenging when he is not being morose or too cavalier. “So,” he says to me, “what is driving your life?” “What do you mean?” say I, for it is apparent that my adversary is armed with agenda. “You know my life quite well,” I continued. “You know how I live and what I do and what my vocation is.” As I said these words I. . .
Read more »

Idolatry — Making Good Things, Ultimate Things

By in Highlands Fellow on

Idolatry — Making Good Things, Ultimate Things

Stories of Idolatry When my children, Bethany and Noah, were younger, I’d climb in bed with them and begin story time. It was rarely a Bible story or traditional bedtime story, but something we’d make up on the spot. I always involved them in the creation process. When the character came to a fork in the road, I’d ask my son which way he should go. Or when a mysterious email arrived in the story, I’d ask my daughter to imagine what the email said and tell us. After she was done, the story would continue to its happy ending.. . .
Read more »

Relativism — America’s Idol

By in Highlands Fellow on

Relativism in Narnia In C.S. Lewis’ The Last Battle, an ape named Shift tried to convince the free animals of Narnia to embrace Calormene culture and serve their king, the Tisroc. Pretending to be Aslan’s prophet, the Ape told the animals that Aslan had sold them into the service of the Tisroc in order to bring all the “benefits” of Calormene culture to the backward land of Narnia. “Please,” said the Lamb, “I can’t understand. What have we to do with the Calormenes? We belong to Aslan. They belong to Tash. They say Tash has four arms and the head. . .
Read more »

Grown Up Idolatry—Work, Wealth & Security

By in Highlands Blog on

Security Blanket Like many children his age, my fourteen-month-old son has a “security blanket” that we call Mr. Lion. Mr. Lion has so entirely bewitched by son under his cute and comforting spell that my son is thoroughly convinced that sleep is not physically possible if he is not holding Mr. Lion. And he voices his opinion on the matter quite loudly! In one sense, it is a small matter and appropriate at his age. On the other hand, I did not have a homeschool lesson on how to find comfort in everyday objects. There was no instruction on how. . .
Read more »

Slave Culture

By in Highlands Fellow on

Slave Culture

Loving Slavery We are a nation of slaves and we love it. We have pursued our masters with all our heart, with all our soul, with all our strength, and with all our minds. And now we are fully content in our serfdom. We don’t feel the stripes on our back, the chafing of the chains, the loss of movement, the indignity. We don’t feel any of that. What we feel is jumpiness I guess, a nervous energy that never seems to go away, an addict’s itch. All we ask for in exchange for the chains is all the stuff. . .
Read more »

Reich.edu

By in Highlands Fellow on

Religious Pluralism & Homeschooling Homeschooling is illegal in Germany and families that refuse to enroll their kids in state schools are fined, arrested, and threatened with losing custody of their children. Recently, German police invaded the home of the Wunderlich family and forcibly removed their children. There were no allegations of abuse or neglect or failure to provide an adequate education. Their crime, according to the Darmstadt family court, was the parents’ failure to cooperate “with the authorities to send the children to school.” The judge also authorized use of force “against the children” because the children had “adopted the. . .
Read more »

Hosted by Elixir 13720