Kingdom Notes

Kingdom Notes by Dr. R.C. Sproul Jr. will help you see what it means to live a simple, separate and deliberate life in the context of our culture. These posts will help you keep your focus on building the kingdom of Christ even as you live and work in a culture that is wayward and distracted.

A Verdict that Demands Evidence

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A Verdict that Demands Evidence

Lying is Bad It’s a bad thing to tell a lie. Generally speaking we oughtn’t to do it. Truth be told, however, I suspect we lie less often than one might think, and do more damage with the non-lies that we tell. For me to lie I have to do two things first — speak an untruth, and know that I am speaking an untruth. It happens. I’ve done it and will do it again for certain. The great thing about lies, however, is that they can be exposed. Which puts some restraint on us from telling them. Accusations &. . .
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Called to Disciple the Nations

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Called to Disciple the Nations

Experiencing God’s Power Power, paradoxically, can sometimes be quite shy. I know great bolts of lightning and the attendant rumbling of thunder do not begin with a polite, and gentle, “Excuse me, may I cut in here?” But neither do they appear on command. While a raging storm may be indifferent to our desires, while it will not, simply because of our wishes, go away and come again some other day, other forms of power positively flee when we seek them out. I learned this first at the communion rail. The church to which I belonged when I was first. . .
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Recognize the Blessing in the Hardship

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Recognize the Blessing in the Hardship

Learn the Meaning of Blessing Because we are by our fallen nature Pelagian we have a natural bent toward the notion of karma. Good things, we think, will happen when we do well, bad things when we do poorly. While it is certainly true that obedience brings blessing, that God’s law is the pathway to joy, and disobedience is sure to bring correction from our loving Father, we need to learn the meaning of blessing, and to distinguish between different kinds of hardships. Sin & Hardship When my wife was going through her third and final battle with cancer she. . .
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The Perfect Family Recipe

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The Perfect Family Recipe

Proverbs & Promises I never want to diminish another’s hardship. Indeed I can’t imagine a greater one. I know there are too many heartbroken parents out there who sought diligently to raise their children in the nurture and admonition of the Lord only to see one or more reject the faith. These hardships, however, ought not cause us to forget the blessings. The promises of God are often more proverbial than mathematical. That is they describe the way He typically works, without turning Him into some sort of blessing vending machine. We use our own proverbs in the same way.. . .
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On Human Cruelty & Selective Application

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On Human Cruelty & Selective Outrage

Cruelty in Iraq & the Middle East I have seen none of the pictures. I have no position on the accuracy of the stories. If it is true that Muslims in the middle east are beheading children it is indeed heartbreaking. What there is little doubt about, that Muslims in the middle east are beheading adults, “marrying” little children, waging a wicked war, persecuting believers, I sadly concede is real. I share with those believers who are brokenhearted the same broken heart. I write today with no interest whatever in lessening the sickening nature of what is going on over. . .
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Think Rightly, Feel Deeply — The Magic of Music

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Think Rightly, Feel Deeply — The Magic of Music

Mind & Emotions CS Lewis, in his trenchant essay, Myth Made Fact makes much of the fact that our hearts and minds tend to be binary. That is, the more clearly we are thinking the less powerfully we are feeling, while the more powerfully we are feeling the less clearly we are thinking. There is a deep and profound difference, for instance, between thinking about pain and being in pain. Indeed thinking about pain is largely painless and often being in pain leaves us thoughtless. Myth, he argues, is the key to getting both operating at once. Myth, he argues,. . .
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The Irony of an Arrogant Calvinist

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The Irony of an Arrogant Calvinist

Reformed, Calvinist, Prideful It’s an irony that hits close to home, so it’s one I make note of regularly. We who confess to being Reformed, Calvinistic, embracing the doctrines of grace, begin our confession of our distinctives with the doctrine of total depravity. We affirm that sin impacts all that we are — our bodies, our emotions, our thoughts and our desires. We affirm that we are unable, unless God should change our nature first, to even want to be changed, much less embrace the work of Christ on our behalf. In short, we have a profoundly low view of. . .
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The Scandal of the Gospel

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The Scandal of the Gospel

Wanting Grace for Us, but Not for Them All of us, both within and without the church, face the temptation of being legalists when dealing with others’ sins against us, and antinomians when dealing with our sins against others. We want those we have perceived to have wronged us to pay for what they have done, while reminding our own tender consciences that we all deserve a little grace. Witnessing to Our Enemies The two propensities come to a head at one and the same time as we seek to preach the gospel of Jesus Christ to the walking dead. . .
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The Bible — Sacred History, Your History

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The Bible — Sacred History, Your History

My Ancestors “Are you RC Sproul’s son?” It’s a common question, and apart from the fact that there would have to be a whole other RC Sproul who also happened to name his son RC for it not to be so, an understandable one. People are often excited to meet me because the work of my father has meant so much to them. When they tell me so my honest reply is, “Me too.” As wonderfully as God has used my father, however, he is not even in the top fifty most potent kingdom building men among my ancestors. The. . .
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Socialism Rightly Applied

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Socialism in the Government The concept of socialism is rightly repugnant to many, especially those of us who have been reared in the individualistic United States. If anyone with a biblical worldview considers the government takeover of corporations and industries, from banking institutions and automobile manufacturers to the healthcare market, they will be rightly disturbed. Many of us open up our newspapers or web browsers with a sense of foreboding — we are not sure what the government will be eying next. Socialism in the Christian Family That said, there are principles of socialism that are not in and of. . .
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In the Game of Politics Justice Loses

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Justice Loses in the Game of Politics

Majoring on Minor Offenses There’s no question that it’s bad form. The trouble I have is with objecting to bad form when the function is so wicked. Last week the President flew to Texas, and took the opportunity to meet with Governor Rick Perry about the border crisis. In several photos of the meeting we see a stern, perhaps disgusted looking Governor watching as the President was either smiling or laughing. In addition the governor was publicly displeased that the President didn’t take time out of his schedule to visit the border. One could certainly argue that the President failed. . .
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Those Who Hate Me Love Death

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Abortion: Those Who Hate Me Love Death

Us & Them The idea of antithesis has a long and honored history in the church, going back one could argue to the Garden of Eden. There God, in light of the wreckage our first parents made, promised to put enmity between the serpent and the woman, between his seed and hers. The world truly is divided into two kinds of people. Much of my labors on the antithesis, the things I write and speak on, looks at the antithesis as an imperative. Thus I encourage people to live more deliberate lives, thinking through our choices that we might be. . .
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Drama-lama-ding-dong — What is Emotional Maturity?

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Drama & Emotional Maturity

Drama for Nothing It is certainly possible to underestimate the importance of something. In fact, I confess that I’m inclined in that direction. When my car makes a weird noise I’m inclined to believe that if I ignore it it will go away on its own. When a pain or illness comes upon me, I simply assume that time will heal it. It usually does, but sometimes what I think is nothing turns out to be something. Nothing but Drama That said, there is a strong challenger pushing away from my ostrich tendencies, my Chicken Little tendencies. As often, if. . .
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The Problem of Anonymity in the Mega-Church

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The Problem of Anonymity in the Mega-Church

Mega-Church Anonymity Though it may be counterintuitive, it is nevertheless true — we have more privacy in the big city than we do in the country. There is actually a converse ration between people per square mile and anonymity levels. In the city, even though we are cheek by jowl, we have precious little interaction and what we do have remains strictly surface. In the country, though we may be as far from each other as to very far away things, we notice things, follow events in each others’ lives, even, truth be told, talk about each other. Many have. . .
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A Loving Response to Sexual Perversion

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A Loving Response to Sexual Perversion

Being Nice to Homosexuals I suspect one of the reasons that the opposition to sodomy that was once the default position of all professing Christians is in such retreat says more than we suspect. We’re now being encouraged to be silent on the issue, for the sake of the gospel, to nuance the issue for the sake of our witness, to rethink Paul for the sake of our credibility. And all this is wrapped up on the one all consuming law of evangelicalism — you have to be nice. We have found that hating the sin and loving the sinner. . .
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Seeing the Humanity in Abortion-bound Women

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Seeing the Humanity in Abortion-bound Women

Abortion Zombies I see dead people. The ones who haunt me most however, are the ones I don’t see. Though it happened twenty-five years ago I still begin to sob as I remember that day where I prayed and sang outside an abortion mill in Jackson, Mississippi. For the first time I watched a pregnant woman enter a building carrying a baby in her womb. A few hours later I saw her walk out, and wretched as I grasped the horror that her baby was now in the trash. I saw the dead mother, a walking zombie. But I never. . .
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Fear-driven Homeschool Standards Leave Our Children Behind

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Fear-driven Homeschool Standards Leave Our Children Behind

Setting Homeschool Standards Of all the things I have ever written, including a profoundly controversial chapter on the origin of evil, nothing has been used more to present me as a monster as this brief story from my book When You Rise Up: A Covenantal Approach to Homeschooling: I have dear friends whom God has blessed with eight [homeschooled] children…They were delightful. But, as is still too often the case, family and friends would often fuss a them because of the choices they had made. The mother made a confession to me…”My nine-year old daughter doesn’t know how to read.”. . .
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Beating Bulverism

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Bulverism is a Temptation for Everyone That Bulverism is a fallacy (wherein one discredits the conclusions of another on the grounds that said conclusions benefit the concluder) does not mean that it is not also a temptation. Suppose, for instance, I were to make the argument that Roberto Clemente was the greatest all around baseball player in history. You would be committing the Bulverism fallacy if you thought you have proven that Willie Mays is actually the best all round player ever by saying to me, “You just think Roberto is best because you are from Pittsburgh.” The issue isn’t. . .
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Five Things I’m Still Sure About God’s Law

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5 Things I'm Still Sure About God's Law

There’s been a bit of a hubbub of late on God’s law. Which is odd, isn’t it, since neither it, nor He has changed in some time. It is true enough that there are plenty of ways to get His law wrong. Just ask Paul. But here are five positive things about the law that I am positive about. 1. It restrains evil. I find myself often frustrated at our overly polite assessment of the human condition. We relegate monsters to history, like the Nazi’s, or to the fringes, like serial killers, all to keep the monster at bay. But. . .
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Slow to Speak: What I Don’t Say but Want To

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Slow to Speak: What I don't Say but Want To

Being Slow to Speak Keeps Your Foot Out of Your Mouth I’m not what you would call a hyper-sensitive fellow. A body has to put in some serious work to offend me. That doesn’t keep me, however, from noting, usually amused, when people put their foot in their mouth talking to me. Because I don’t want to offend I usually keep the retorts I come up with in my head. But I thought, since none of you have likely said any of these things to me, it might be fun to share them with you. Are all these yours? When. . .
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