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Posts By Dr. R.C. Sproul, Jr.


If you could have done one thing differently as a husband, what would it be?

My Deepest Regret It is both awkward and encouraging the feedback I have received over the past few years for the writing I have done during my beloved’s illness, homegoing and absence. I especially rejoice when I hear that the things I have written have served another in a time of hardship. It remains my intention to use what I have written in a book in the future. That said, I still believe that the most vulnerable, most insightful, most helpful thing I wrote all along this journey was this brief tweet — I wish I had held her hand. . .
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Ray Rice, Domestic Violence, and Other Monsters

Connecting the Dots It is, I believe, a useful habit that I stumbled upon now more than 20 years ago. I have found that forcing myself to look at two issues at once often helps me see a new perspective on both issues that I otherwise would have missed. It started when I was an editor for Tabletalk magazine and I had an idea. Each issue, then and now, is sort of two magazines, a daily Bible study, as well as a thematic issue. “Why don’t we,” I asked the team, “publish a ‘bridge’ article each month? For our first. . .
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A Verdict that Demands Evidence

Lying is Bad It’s a bad thing to tell a lie. Generally speaking we oughtn’t to do it. Truth be told, however, I suspect we lie less often than one might think, and do more damage with the non-lies that we tell. For me to lie I have to do two things first — speak an untruth, and know that I am speaking an untruth. It happens. I’ve done it and will do it again for certain. The great thing about lies, however, is that they can be exposed. Which puts some restraint on us from telling them. Accusations &. . .
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What is it like to be a single parent?

The Realization The first time I realized I was a single parent was while serving on a panel discussing how the church might better serve those in “broken families.” I was on the panel simply because I was a pastor, and as I was answering a particular question from the audience it came crashing down on me, “Oh, I’m in a broken family.” There is a reason, however, it took so long for this reality to dawn on me — it’s just not a “thing.” That is, I don’t look in the mirror and think, “Single parent.” I don’t look. . .
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Called to Disciple the Nations

Experiencing God’s Power Power, paradoxically, can sometimes be quite shy. I know great bolts of lightning and the attendant rumbling of thunder do not begin with a polite, and gentle, “Excuse me, may I cut in here?” But neither do they appear on command. While a raging storm may be indifferent to our desires, while it will not, simply because of our wishes, go away and come again some other day, other forms of power positively flee when we seek them out. I learned this first at the communion rail. The church to which I belonged when I was first. . .
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Recognize the Blessing in the Hardship

Learn the Meaning of Blessing Because we are by our fallen nature Pelagian we have a natural bent toward the notion of karma. Good things, we think, will happen when we do well, bad things when we do poorly. While it is certainly true that obedience brings blessing, that God’s law is the pathway to joy, and disobedience is sure to bring correction from our loving Father, we need to learn the meaning of blessing, and to distinguish between different kinds of hardships. Sin & Hardship When my wife was going through her third and final battle with cancer she. . .
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Is it appropriate to serve communion to shut-ins?

It is most certainly appropriate for the elders of the church to serve communion to members who are, for health or other reasons, unable to attend the gathering of God’s people on the Lord’s Day. Before we get to how and why, however, let me list a few caveats. First, the sacraments are given to the church, and are under the authority of the local church. We ought not, if we are shut in, arrange a private communion ceremony on our own. Neither should a non-elder, except perhaps in the most dire circumstances, serve communion to a shut in. Common. . .
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The Perfect Family Recipe

Proverbs & Promises I never want to diminish another’s hardship. Indeed I can’t imagine a greater one. I know there are too many heartbroken parents out there who sought diligently to raise their children in the nurture and admonition of the Lord only to see one or more reject the faith. These hardships, however, ought not cause us to forget the blessings. The promises of God are often more proverbial than mathematical. That is they describe the way He typically works, without turning Him into some sort of blessing vending machine. We use our own proverbs in the same way.. . .
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On Human Cruelty & Selective Application

Cruelty in Iraq & the Middle East I have seen none of the pictures. I have no position on the accuracy of the stories. If it is true that Muslims in the middle east are beheading children it is indeed heartbreaking. What there is little doubt about, that Muslims in the middle east are beheading adults, “marrying” little children, waging a wicked war, persecuting believers, I sadly concede is real. I share with those believers who are brokenhearted the same broken heart. I write today with no interest whatever in lessening the sickening nature of what is going on over. . .
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What is the difference between biblical theology & systematic theology?

The Terminology In the context of this question we are using the phrase “biblical theology” in a specific, technical sense. In its general sense all biblical theology means is a theology that is biblical, true to the Bible. And we all hope, whenever we are engaged in systematic theology, that we are affirming what the Bible affirms, that it is a biblical theology. The Methodology When however, the terms come up in contrast they reflect less the content of theology and more the methodology of studying theology. Systematic theology is an approach that addresses key issues in our thinking by. . .
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Think Rightly, Feel Deeply — The Magic of Music

Mind & Emotions CS Lewis, in his trenchant essay, Myth Made Fact makes much of the fact that our hearts and minds tend to be binary. That is, the more clearly we are thinking the less powerfully we are feeling, while the more powerfully we are feeling the less clearly we are thinking. There is a deep and profound difference, for instance, between thinking about pain and being in pain. Indeed thinking about pain is largely painless and often being in pain leaves us thoughtless. Myth, he argues, is the key to getting both operating at once. Myth, he argues,. . .
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Shouldn’t we send our children to the government’s schools so they can witness to their peers?

Objection to Homeschooling: Our Calling to be Salt and Light If there were any objection to homeschooling that might have legs, this one might be it. Every believer, I trust, is eager to see sinners brought to salvation. Everyone knows that we are called to be salt and light, indeed that being such blesses even our unbelieving neighbors. Add to this the certain truth that actual eternal souls have been brought in through the faithful witness of believers in the government’s schools. Who could be against an army of little missionaries entering the lions’ den that is the government’s school. . .
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The Irony of an Arrogant Calvinist

Reformed, Calvinist, Prideful It’s an irony that hits close to home, so it’s one I make note of regularly. We who confess to being Reformed, Calvinistic, embracing the doctrines of grace, begin our confession of our distinctives with the doctrine of total depravity. We affirm that sin impacts all that we are — our bodies, our emotions, our thoughts and our desires. We affirm that we are unable, unless God should change our nature first, to even want to be changed, much less embrace the work of Christ on our behalf. In short, we have a profoundly low view of. . .
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Should tithes and offerings be collected during the worship service?

It was likely the most surreal thing I’ve ever witnessed at a worship service. Not surprisingly it happened Sunday morning at the Orlando Convention Center. My esteemed father was scheduled to preach at this service in conjunction with the annual Christian Booksellers Association convention. Back in those days CBA was a huge deal, with more than 5,000 souls in attendance representing book and music publishers, authors and artists and Christian bookstore owners. I don’t remember what big name sang the offertory, but it was a big name. Just before my father got up to speak, however, a gentleman in a. . .
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What are 7 things our generation has forgotten?

Every generation has not just its blind spots, but its amnesiac moments, truths once held, even honored, that the rising generation let go of. One might call these things Slipping Off the Shoulders of Giants. Here are seven truths our fathers in the faith grasped that we have forgotten. It’s not about me. One of the reasons the greatest generation earned their title is because they sacrificed for others. In our day, because we engage in distant wars for hazy reasons, our soldiers are left fighting for mere geo-political interests. Some do so for a paycheck. Some do so to. . .
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The Scandal of the Gospel

Wanting Grace for Us, but Not for Them All of us, both within and without the church, face the temptation of being legalists when dealing with others’ sins against us, and antinomians when dealing with our sins against others. We want those we have perceived to have wronged us to pay for what they have done, while reminding our own tender consciences that we all deserve a little grace. Witnessing to Our Enemies The two propensities come to a head at one and the same time as we seek to preach the gospel of Jesus Christ to the walking dead. . .
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What are 5 things to remember when talking with atheists?

Here are five things to remember as you converse with atheists: There are no atheists. Romans 1 tells us that unbelievers suppress the truth of God’s existence in unrighteousness (vs 8). They want not to believe, but they know there is a God, and know that they stand guilty before Him. Do not think you are dealing with a disinterested scholar who is just lacking good information. You are dealing with someone angry and frightened, someone rightly terrified over his own guilt. If they get angry, chances are they are angry at God more than you. No matter how smart. . .
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The Bible — Sacred History, Your History

My Ancestors “Are you RC Sproul’s son?” It’s a common question, and apart from the fact that there would have to be a whole other RC Sproul who also happened to name his son RC for it not to be so, an understandable one. People are often excited to meet me because the work of my father has meant so much to them. When they tell me so my honest reply is, “Me too.” As wonderfully as God has used my father, however, he is not even in the top fifty most potent kingdom building men among my ancestors. The. . .
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Why do we love taking internet quizzes?

What Pizza Topping are You? I don’t know. More importantly, neither does anyone else. The better question is, why would anyone think anyone could know? Though they have been with us for some time I’m seeing more and more quizzes on sundry social media feeds promising to tell me not just what pizza topping I am but which castaway on Gilligan’s Island, which 80’s pop diva, which former Secretary General of the United Nations. I’m not such a grumpus as to argue that there is something sinful about taking such quizzes. Nor am I inclined to believe that anyone takes. . .
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In the Game of Politics Justice Loses

Majoring on Minor Offenses There’s no question that it’s bad form. The trouble I have is with objecting to bad form when the function is so wicked. Last week the President flew to Texas, and took the opportunity to meet with Governor Rick Perry about the border crisis. In several photos of the meeting we see a stern, perhaps disgusted looking Governor watching as the President was either smiling or laughing. In addition the governor was publicly displeased that the President didn’t take time out of his schedule to visit the border. One could certainly argue that the President failed. . .
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Dr. R.C. Sproul, Jr.

Dr. R.C. Sproul, Jr..

Dr. R.C. Sproul Jr. is a graduate of Reformed Theological Seminary, and Grove City College. He received his Doctorate of Ministry in 2001 and is Founder, Chairman and Teacher of Highlands Ministries.
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