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Posts By Dr. R.C. Sproul, Jr.


The Bible — Sacred History, Your History

My Ancestors “Are you RC Sproul’s son?” It’s a common question, and apart from the fact that there would have to be a whole other RC Sproul who also happened to name his son RC for it not to be so, an understandable one. People are often excited to meet me because the work of my father has meant so much to them. When they tell me so my honest reply is, “Me too.” As wonderfully as God has used my father, however, he is not even in the top fifty most potent kingdom building men among my ancestors. The. . . Read more »

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Why do we love taking internet quizzes?

What Pizza Topping are You? I don’t know. More importantly, neither does anyone else. The better question is, why would anyone think anyone could know? Though they have been with us for some time I’m seeing more and more quizzes on sundry social media feeds promising to tell me not just what pizza topping I am but which castaway on Gilligan’s Island, which 80’s pop diva, which former Secretary General of the United Nations. I’m not such a grumpus as to argue that there is something sinful about taking such quizzes. Nor am I inclined to believe that anyone takes. . . Read more »

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In the Game of Politics Justice Loses

Majoring on Minor Offenses There’s no question that it’s bad form. The trouble I have is with objecting to bad form when the function is so wicked. Last week the President flew to Texas, and took the opportunity to meet with Governor Rick Perry about the border crisis. In several photos of the meeting we see a stern, perhaps disgusted looking Governor watching as the President was either smiling or laughing. In addition the governor was publicly displeased that the President didn’t take time out of his schedule to visit the border. One could certainly argue that the President failed. . . Read more »

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Should we allow abortions to save the life of the mother?

No. Neither should we allow bank robberies, kidnappings nor terrorist attacks to save the life of the mother. The truth is that abortion has as much to do with saving the life of a pregnant mother as a bank robbery does. An intentional abortion is a self-conscious decision to take the life of an unborn child, and that is never, never necessary to save the life of a mother. Challenging Situations We talk this way, however, because we live in a world which sometimes produces deep challenges. Since the fall of man we have all been conceived dying. Medicine, however,. . . Read more »

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Those Who Hate Me Love Death

Us & Them The idea of antithesis has a long and honored history in the church, going back one could argue to the Garden of Eden. There God, in light of the wreckage our first parents made, promised to put enmity between the serpent and the woman, between his seed and hers. The world truly is divided into two kinds of people. Much of my labors on the antithesis, the things I write and speak on, looks at the antithesis as an imperative. Thus I encourage people to live more deliberate lives, thinking through our choices that we might be. . . Read more »

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Is America a city shining on a hill?

Youthful View of American Exceptionalism I like to think there was a smidge of pity to mute the glaring pride in grade school me. As I studied geography, learning this and that about this other nation, that other continent I genuinely felt sorry for my age-group peers outside our borders. What must it be like, I wondered, to wake up every morning knowing you are not a part of the greatest nation in the history of the world? Were those boys consumed with envy, or were they just ignorant? It wasn’t long, however, before leftist ideologues in the schools tried. . . Read more »

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Drama-lama-ding-dong — What is Emotional Maturity?

Drama for Nothing It is certainly possible to underestimate the importance of something. In fact, I confess that I’m inclined in that direction. When my car makes a weird noise I’m inclined to believe that if I ignore it it will go away on its own. When a pain or illness comes upon me, I simply assume that time will heal it. It usually does, but sometimes what I think is nothing turns out to be something. Nothing but Drama That said, there is a strong challenger pushing away from my ostrich tendencies, my Chicken Little tendencies. As often, if. . . Read more »

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How much detail do we need to go into when evangelizing?

Believe All that God Has Revealed Because God is one (Deuteronomy 6:4) and God is truth, it follows that truth is one. While we can talk about distinct propositions, the truth is that truth is monolithic, one piece, simple rather than parts. Such means, of course, that His revelation is not part cake, and part icing, part substance and part sizzle. It’s not as though justification by faith alone is the painting and election is the frame. We are called to believe all that God has revealed, and every error in our thinking is at least implicitly dangerous. Our Error, . . . Read more »

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Are evangelicals pro-life?

What I Mean by Pro-Life It’s not a trick question. You won’t find in what follows a specious argument that to be pro-life one must oppose the death penalty, or embrace pacifism. By pro-life, in this context I mean committed to the notion that the murder of the unborn is not only wicked, but ought to be illegal, like any other murder. I know we like to think we’re pro-life. But I’m afraid we’re fooling ourselves. Evangelicals are Procuring Abortions First, one in six abortions in America is procured by a professing evangelical. That means that if only professing evangelicals. . . Read more »

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R.C. Sproul Jr. what do you love to teach about?

Typecast Speaker Though I have from time to time been typecast, sometimes as the family guy, others the economics guy, and still more, the suffering guy, I am blessed to be called to speak on a number of different themes. I speak at pro-life events, theological conferences, apologetics gatherings, homeschool conventions and more. I am grateful for all those opportunities, and I pray that I always speak from a position of biblical passion. That said, and not wanting to close off any opportunities outside of this sweet spot, there are some things I get more excited about than others. R.C.. . . Read more »

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The Problem of Anonymity in the Mega-Church

Mega-Church Anonymity Though it may be counterintuitive, it is nevertheless true — we have more privacy in the big city than we do in the country. There is actually a converse ration between people per square mile and anonymity levels. In the city, even though we are cheek by jowl, we have precious little interaction and what we do have remains strictly surface. In the country, though we may be as far from each other as to very far away things, we notice things, follow events in each others’ lives, even, truth be told, talk about each other. Many have. . . Read more »

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A Loving Response to Sexual Perversion

Being Nice to Homosexuals I suspect one of the reasons that the opposition to sodomy that was once the default position of all professing Christians is in such retreat says more than we suspect. We’re now being encouraged to be silent on the issue, for the sake of the gospel, to nuance the issue for the sake of our witness, to rethink Paul for the sake of our credibility. And all this is wrapped up on the one all consuming law of evangelicalism — you have to be nice. We have found that hating the sin and loving the sinner. . . Read more »

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Why are evangelicals guilty of one in six abortions in America?

Christians Can & Do Murder Before I offer up my thinking on the why’s, two things need to be said. First, the source of this statistic is here. Second, while we cannot know the hearts of others, it is important to understand that murder is not beyond a true believer. David, a man after God’s own heart, committed murder in order to cover up the adultery he committed. We Christians are reborn, indwelt, and we do in fact grow in grace. In addition, we do not practice gross and heinous sins. We do, however, from time to time, commit them,. . . Read more »

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Seeing the Humanity in Abortion-bound Women

Abortion Zombies I see dead people. The ones who haunt me most however, are the ones I don’t see. Though it happened twenty-five years ago I still begin to sob as I remember that day where I prayed and sang outside an abortion mill in Jackson, Mississippi. For the first time I watched a pregnant woman enter a building carrying a baby in her womb. A few hours later I saw her walk out, and wretched as I grasped the horror that her baby was now in the trash. I saw the dead mother, a walking zombie. But I never. . . Read more »

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Fear-driven Homeschool Standards Leave Our Children Behind

Setting Homeschool Standards Of all the things I have ever written, including a profoundly controversial chapter on the origin of evil, nothing has been used more to present me as a monster as this brief story from my book When You Rise Up: A Covenantal Approach to Homeschooling: I have dear friends whom God has blessed with eight [homeschooled] children…They were delightful. But, as is still too often the case, family and friends would often fuss a them because of the choices they had made. The mother made a confession to me…”My nine-year old daughter doesn’t know how to read.”. . . Read more »

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What are ten fiction books you recommend for homeschool teenagers?

A while back you published a list of the ten books your teenagers read as part of the homeschool education. They were all non-fiction. What fiction do you have your children read? I was honestly surprised when this was pointed out to me. I would guess over the course of my life I’ve read two works of fiction for every work of non-fiction. I hadn’t planned at all to make the list all non-fiction, and so am happy to add here fiction. As with before I am not here arguing that these are the ten best fiction works ever, only. . . Read more »

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Beating Bulverism

Bulverism is a Temptation for Everyone That Bulverism is a fallacy (wherein one discredits the conclusions of another on the grounds that said conclusions benefit the concluder) does not mean that it is not also a temptation. Suppose, for instance, I were to make the argument that Roberto Clemente was the greatest all around baseball player in history. You would be committing the Bulverism fallacy if you thought you have proven that Willie Mays is actually the best all round player ever by saying to me, “You just think Roberto is best because you are from Pittsburgh.” The issue isn’t. . . Read more »

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Five Things I’m Still Sure About God’s Law

There’s been a bit of a hubbub of late on God’s law. Which is odd, isn’t it, since neither it, nor He has changed in some time. It is true enough that there are plenty of ways to get His law wrong. Just ask Paul. But here are five positive things about the law that I am positive about. 1. It restrains evil. I find myself often frustrated at our overly polite assessment of the human condition. We relegate monsters to history, like the Nazi’s, or to the fringes, like serial killers, all to keep the monster at bay. But. . . Read more »

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If you could destroy the internet, would you?

You have a big red button that will allow you to destroy the Internet. What do you do? Do you destroy it or keep it around? Why? I’ve never understood those who take a principial objection to hypothetical questions. “I make it a point never to answer hypotheticals” they tell me. Really? The truth is I actually have no such button. But it is helpful to consider what I might do if I did. I know what I’d do first—wrestle with whether to push the button. That is, I suspect it would be something of a close call. Because, naturally,. . . Read more »

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Slow to Speak: What I Don’t Say but Want To

Being Slow to Speak Keeps Your Foot Out of Your Mouth I’m not what you would call a hyper-sensitive fellow. A body has to put in some serious work to offend me. That doesn’t keep me, however, from noting, usually amused, when people put their foot in their mouth talking to me. Because I don’t want to offend I usually keep the retorts I come up with in my head. But I thought, since none of you have likely said any of these things to me, it might be fun to share them with you. Are all these yours? When. . . Read more »

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To All the Moms I’ve Loved Before

Celebrating Motherhood When we celebrate Mother’s Day we are celebrating two things. First, we are giving thanks to our own mothers. As we ought. All of us, even those whose relationships with their moms were complicated, owe a debt of gratitude for the sacrifices that were made. Some of us, the present write included, have a decidedly uncomplicated relationship, and have nothing but thanks to give. There is, however, a second thing we celebrate each Mother’s Day — motherhood. Though it is unfashionable to say so in these unisex days, mothers are rightly honored precisely because of their prodigious gifts. . . Read more »

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Homeschooling Begins at Birth

A recent study conducted by the Institute of the Incredibly Obvious reports that 100 percent of children living at home are being homeschooled. Institute spokesman, Dr. Name Changed to Protect the Guilty, stated that these shocking results stunned the institute’s scientists as they discovered that long after the cessation of teachers, books, and dirty looks, children continue to learn in their homes, every day of the year, including official state holidays. This report has done wonders for the social acceptance of homeschooling, but it has also concerned those who considered themselves homeschoolers before the release of this study. “Does this. . . Read more »

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Why do you sometimes wear a kilt?

The Kilt as Formal Wear The last time I wore my kilt was at the joyous occasion of the marriage of my first born daughter. The answer for why I wore it then is simple enough—it was a formal occasion. The kilt was a gift from my parents some twenty years ago. Over the past two decades I suspect that I have had roughly about 30 occasions to wear it. I wore it when I was first ordained, ironically to make an important point about the insignificance of our cultural heritages. I was originally ordained in an old and faithful. . . Read more »

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Learning from the Sterling Uproar—Loving the Sins, Hating the Sinners

Jesus & the Pharisees Here’s a test—if an idea is profoundly facile, and it makes me come out smelling like a rose, there’s a rather good chance that it’s as false as my own dark heart. Or to put it another way, cultural tropes that somehow keep putting a white hat on me and a black hat on my enemies are almost certainly off. Consider this little nugget. Jesus, we are told, spent all His time on earth hanging out with the culturally despised, while hating on the Pharisees who were doing the despising. This in turn means that when. . . Read more »

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Do you think Jesus will come back soon?

No. Not at all. I think it likely that we have tens of thousands of years to go before Jesus comes back. I know that every odd astronomical event, every middle eastern hot spot fires up the end times hysteria machine, but I’m not willing to get on that ride. I suspect even if we don’t buy into dispensational end times scenarios we still find it plausible that the world will come to an end soon enough. I suspect we are inclined in that direction because we live in an age of hopelessness in the broader culture. The specter of. . . Read more »

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Dig Deeper, Grow Stronger

Dear Friends, Living faithfully before God and under His word in a culture working to tear down Christian families at every turn is a challenge. Our bright hope is in digging deep into God’s word and feeding on His promises for us and for our children. He is faithful. Highlands Ministries produces resources to help your faith grow, encouraging biblical faithfulness in all areas of life. There is no part of ourselves Christ leaves unclaimed, no area untouched by the truth of His word. The deeper our roots sink into biblical truth the stronger we become for the work of. . . Read more »

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Firing Rome’s Canon

Protestant Ignorance I remain, even in these feel good days, a Protestant. What I protest is what my fathers protested—the folly of the Roman Catholic church. Such can get you in great deal of hot water these days. Everyone wants to go along to get along. Trouble is, Rome still teaches a false gospel, still calls for the damnation of people like me who preach the true gospel. Now I am happy to confess that explaining the nuances that separate infusion from imputation, distinctions between justification and sanctification can require a bit of theological training and historical understanding. I’m sorry. . . Read more »

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Bloomin’ Nutty

Is Michael Bloomberg Going to Heaven? I can’t know, for sure, if former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg is among the elect. I’m pretty sure, however, that were he to die right now he’ll end up in hell. How can I be so confident? Because of the ground of his confidence he’ll end up in heaven. In a New York Times interview he claimed—”I am telling you if there is a God, when I get to heaven I’m not stopping to be interviewed. I am heading straight in. I have earned my place in heaven. It’s not even close.”. . . Read more »

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No More Teachers, No More Books—A Homeschool Weakness

We move forward by moving backward. Or, to put it another way, we grow in grace by becoming acquainted with our sins, from the most recent back to the first. Many homeschoolers, for instance, begin their journey because they are so aghast at the latest moral outrage brought to us by the government school system that their consciences will no longer allow them to hand over their children. To escape the folly of Heather Has Two Mommies, we bring our children home. Once they are there, we are delighted to learn that we are becoming free of a whole host. . . Read more »

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How can I know if I’m saved? 5 Key Principles

There is no greater personal issue than our relationship with the living God. There are no greater stakes imaginable than the difference between eternal torment and eternal bliss. As such it is no wonder that so many struggle with issues of assurance of salvation. I cannot, of course cover the gamut of the issues in a brief piece, but can give some basic principles that I pray will help. 1. No one is allowed, save the Lamb, to look into the Book of Life, but there is no need to. Too often, especially in Reformed circles, the concern is expressed. . . Read more »

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Live Stream Event with Dr. R.C. Sproul Jr.

Live Stream R.C. Sproul Jr. to Your Living Room!  At the 2014 Family Discipleship & Homeschooling Conference, April 25-26 Watch the preview video below! Dear Friends, I’m writing to invite you to join me via live stream at the 2014 Family Discipleship & Homeschooling Conference, April 25-26 in Redmond, WA. My friends at Christian Heritage are offering all of you $5 off the Live Stream Pass, so you can join thousands of other homeschoolers for two full days of hope, encouragement and inspiration—for just $24.95. That’s over $60 in savings compared to the onsite pass! Click here to receive $5 off your. . . Read more »

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Evil Employees & Saintly Corporations

Economics of Buying & Selling It is a common but dangerous business, our propensity to make ourselves the heroes of our own stories, and to see all who stand in our way as wearing the black hats. As a person with an interest in all things economic I see it in the realm of our buying and trading all the time. We all want to sell high and buy low. And we are all sellers and buyers. We all sell our labor in the marketplace. And we buy what we buy. The ones in the black hats, we think, are. . . Read more »

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What are ten books your teenagers read as part of their homeschool education?

One of the weaknesses of the school model of education is that it squeezes out great books that don’t fit neatly into one or another of those artificial divisions of learning we call “subjects.” We don’t start with, “What books have had a deep impact in shaping what I am?” But with “What subjects am I supposed to be teaching, and which books will help me teach them?” I don’t teach my children subjects—I seek to instill in them wisdom. Which means I have them read the books that gave me wisdom. All God’s Children and Blue Suede Shoes: The. . . Read more »

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Buck Up

My beloved wife was a valiant woman and a fierce brawler and so I never had to encourage my wife to keep fighting. There were moments, however, when we both found ourselves weeping for what we were losing. As those moments came it was my habit to remind the both of us not only of what we had had, not only what we still had, but what we would always have. I reminded us that our treasure was safely in heaven, that we had been given the pearl of great price, and everything that could be taken from us was. . . Read more »

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Should we vote in church?

Types of Church Government There are, at base, three forms of government. The first is rule by one. The second is rule by a few, the third rule by all. In civil government this would essentially be monarchy, republic and democracy, broadly speaking. In church government it would be episcopacy, presbyterianism, and congregationalism, broadly speaking. Rightly understood then the church, whatever denomination, if it is indeed a part of the church, is an episcopacy. Just as Jesus reigns over the nations, so He reigns over the church. His vicar, however, is not the bishop of Rome, but the Holy Spirit.. . . Read more »

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We Have Not Because We Ask Not

Praying Blessing for Your Family God has not only blessed me with a wonderful family but has blessed me with the opportunity to teach about the family and the Bible on radio programs, in audio and DVD teaching series, in books, and through dozens of occasions to speak at churches around the country. As I speak about a vision for what the family can be, I tell attendees that the single most important thing they should do for their families is to pray. Yes, my great moment of insight is to tell them to pray for their wives, their children,. . . Read more »

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Digging Deep—Sin & the Gospel

It’s eye-catching when reality catches up with folks. See a man caught up in his road rage, waving one angry finger at the slow poke in the passing lane. When his truck flops and flails into the median we all think, “What was he thinking?” I mean, what driver thinks, “It is perfectly safe for me to drive with one hand while looking at a ninety degree angle to my left”? Or take World Vision. I was not at any of the high level meetings that must have taken place before they announced their decision to warmly embrace “married” couples. . . Read more »

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What is the “gift of singleness” and how do I know if I have it?

  Difficulties of I Corinthians 7 If ever there were a chapter in the Bible fraught with challenges it would be I Corinthians 7. Among the difficulties are these: Paul distinguishes between his authority and that of the Lord. Do we best defend the authority of the Scripture by defending Paul in what he says about the issues, or in what he says about him not speaking as receiving instruction from the Lord? Are the present challenges that Paul uses to encourage celibacy still present? Given that he doesn’t say what those circumstances were, it’s hard to say. He is. . . Read more »

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What is systematic theology & why is it important?

Note: the Alphabet Series of Basement Tapes is now available! Scroll to the bottom of this post for more information. It is an important part of my task as I teach Reformation Bible College students systematic theology to familiarize them with the grammar of our theological conversations. I’m called to introduce them not just to the issues theologians wrestle with, but to the language they use when wrestling with the issues. In the broader evangelical world we have a hard enough time interesting people in any study of theology, let alone adding this rather odd adjective—systematic. The language is as. . . Read more »

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They Labor In Vain, Or a Funny Thing Happened While I Preached My Daughter’s Wedding

Psalm 127 Just a few days ago I was privileged to be able to preach at a rather significant occasion, the wedding ceremony of my first-born. Darby was, like her mother, not just a beautiful and radiant bride, but a diligent, faithful laborer in bringing the event together. When I told her I would like to preach from Psalm 127 I could tell she was a smidge reluctant to give her approval. Perhaps she feared that I would chasten her and her new husband to remember that children are a blessing from the Lord, and I wanted grandbabies, and soon.. . . Read more »

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Phelps, Driscoll, & Gothard

Though I hope you will stick around and see this piece through to the bitter end, I must confess to a bit of bait and switch. You will find precious little in what follows about the death of Fred Phelps, the apology of Mark Driscoll, nor the resignation of Bill Gothard. What you will find is an explanation for why they are in my title but not in my piece. Looking for Approval Like most people I long for approval. Like most people I look for it not only in the wrong places, but with the wrong measuring sticks. The. . . Read more »

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Who’s Your Daddy?

Darkness of the World This past weekend Ligonier Ministries hosted its annual conference, the theme being “Overcoming the World.” I was blessed to hear some amazing preaching, as with every year. Voddie Baucham reminded us of our three great enemies, the world, the flesh and the devil. Robert Godfrey spoke on our call to stand, as our father Athanasius did before us, contra mundum, against the world. We talked about the evils of abortion, the stunning rout of the homosexual lobby is shifting public opinion. I am not leaving the conference, however, squinting to find a silver lining around the. . . Read more »

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Apologetics, Arguments & Walking Toward the Light

Arguing Among Ourselves It is one of my favorite ways to poke at my own tribe. I know exposing the folly of persnickety, precise, and proud, Reformed folk is like shooting Icthus’s in a baptismal barrel, but it needs to be done. In a still smaller circle, that “epistemologically self-conscious,” sub-section of the Reformed that uses such terms as epistemologically self-conscious, we elevate our persnickety-ness, our precision and our pride to Olympian heights. We sit in our armchairs, stroking our beards, tamping our pipes, expositing our syllogisms, while our spiritual flies are down. What I do is run through an. . . Read more »

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How are you dealing with your first born’s impending marriage?

Managing a Large Family Because so few people understand the logistics of managing a large family, and so few know the great genius and diligence of my dear wife, many people at the loss of my wife were most concerned about logistical concerns—how would all the stuff of managing a household get taken care of? The truth is that my dear wife built the railroad, built the engine and stacked the coal. All I have to do is make sure the fire continues to get fed. Now, however, we are soon to lose the platonic ideal of a first born. . . Read more »

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Giving Thanks

Unusual Blessing I am a blessed man. I have wonderful children that love me and each other. I have parents who love me and each other. I have friends nearby, and across the country. I even have friends on every continent. Well, to be scrupulous, I don’t have any penguin friends. But I was reminded the other day to be thankful for a blessing I’ve been given that many have not. The national headquarters for the American Automobile Association is less than five miles from my home. I was driving by their mammoth facility, thinking about how very crowded it. . . Read more »

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If we ask anything in Jesus name, will He really do it?

If you ask anything in My name I will do it? John 14:14 Believing God’s Promises My book, Believing God, was written with a single goal in mind, to help believers enter more fully into the promises of God. Even we who affirm that God’s Word is always true still struggle to believe that if we ask for wisdom He will give it to us (James 1:5), that children are a blessing from the Lord (Psalm 127), that we will be like Him for we shall see Him as He is (I John 3:4). Having pushed for greater faith, greater. . . Read more »

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Fearful Fatherhood

Fatherhood is Difficult We all, I believe, operate under a wide range of unspoken equations. We like our lives marked by ease and peace. We dispatch, without thinking, anything that challenges our ease and peace. At least I do. One of my equations that lurks just beneath the surface is this: if a job is difficult, it’s not my job. Even more accurately, if it’s frightening, it must not be required of me. I have seven children. Each is dependent on me for their provision. I must not provoke them to wrath but must raise them in the nurture and. . . Read more »

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Turning the Other Cheek

Homosexual Agenda Craig James, former football star at SMU, and briefly an sportscaster with Fox Sports, is in court. After his convictions on the nature of marriage, the sin of sexual perversion became known to the network he was fired. And now he has filed a complaint with the Texas Workforce Commission, with help from the Liberty Institute. I share Mr. James’ convictions, without shame or apology. They are nothing more nor less than what the Bible affirms on the issues at hand. I am in turn frustrated and angry at the legal brutality of the homosexual lobby against people. . . Read more »

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What do you think of the movie, Son of God?

Making Images Given that I haven’t seen it, one might think I hadn’t given it much thought. But I have. I could here take a stab at solving the immediate second commandment problem. Some argue that on its face, any movie that depicts Jesus is of necessity a violation of the second commandment which forbids making graven images. It’s a rather sticky wicket given the nuances of our understanding of the incarnation. God, for instance, is spirit. The body of Jesus, while most assuredly in union with God the Son, belongs properly to His human nature. But, an image of. . . Read more »

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Faux Pearls

Maslow was wrong. Well, he was right before he was wrong. It is true enough that we all have a hierarchy of needs. Some things are more important than others. Trouble is, he didn’t know what the most important things were. Foundational in his system are those things necessary for survival, things like food and water. King David had a different, a better perspective. He said that the Lord was His Shepherd, and he shall not want (Psalm 23:1). David, at this point, has no green grass, and no still water. To be sure God does provide these things, but. . . Read more »

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Dr. R.C. Sproul, Jr.

Dr. R.C. Sproul, Jr..

Dr. R.C. Sproul Jr. is a graduate of Reformed Theological Seminary, and Grove City College. He received his Doctorate of Ministry in 2001 and is Founder, Chairman and Teacher of Highlands Ministries.
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