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Posts By Dr. R.C. Sproul, Jr.


What are ten books your teenagers read as part of their homeschool education?

One of the weaknesses of the school model of education is that it squeezes out great books that don’t fit neatly into one or another of those artificial divisions of learning we call “subjects.” We don’t start with, “What books have had a deep impact in shaping what I am?” But with “What subjects am I supposed to be teaching, and which books will help me teach them?” I don’t teach my children subjects—I seek to instill in them wisdom. Which means I have them read the books that gave me wisdom. All God’s Children and Blue Suede Shoes: The. . . Read more »

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Buck Up

My beloved wife was a valiant woman and a fierce brawler and so I never had to encourage my wife to keep fighting. There were moments, however, when we both found ourselves weeping for what we were losing. As those moments came it was my habit to remind the both of us not only of what we had had, not only what we still had, but what we would always have. I reminded us that our treasure was safely in heaven, that we had been given the pearl of great price, and everything that could be taken from us was. . . Read more »

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Should we vote in church?

Types of Church Government There are, at base, three forms of government. The first is rule by one. The second is rule by a few, the third rule by all. In civil government this would essentially be monarchy, republic and democracy, broadly speaking. In church government it would be episcopacy, presbyterianism, and congregationalism, broadly speaking. Rightly understood then the church, whatever denomination, if it is indeed a part of the church, is an episcopacy. Just as Jesus reigns over the nations, so He reigns over the church. His vicar, however, is not the bishop of Rome, but the Holy Spirit.. . . Read more »

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We Have Not Because We Ask Not

Praying Blessing for Your Family God has not only blessed me with a wonderful family but has blessed me with the opportunity to teach about the family and the Bible on radio programs, in audio and DVD teaching series, in books, and through dozens of occasions to speak at churches around the country. As I speak about a vision for what the family can be, I tell attendees that the single most important thing they should do for their families is to pray. Yes, my great moment of insight is to tell them to pray for their wives, their children,. . . Read more »

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Digging Deep—Sin & the Gospel

It’s eye-catching when reality catches up with folks. See a man caught up in his road rage, waving one angry finger at the slow poke in the passing lane. When his truck flops and flails into the median we all think, “What was he thinking?” I mean, what driver thinks, “It is perfectly safe for me to drive with one hand while looking at a ninety degree angle to my left”? Or take World Vision. I was not at any of the high level meetings that must have taken place before they announced their decision to warmly embrace “married” couples. . . Read more »

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What is the “gift of singleness” and how do I know if I have it?

  Difficulties of I Corinthians 7 If ever there were a chapter in the Bible fraught with challenges it would be I Corinthians 7. Among the difficulties are these: Paul distinguishes between his authority and that of the Lord. Do we best defend the authority of the Scripture by defending Paul in what he says about the issues, or in what he says about him not speaking as receiving instruction from the Lord? Are the present challenges that Paul uses to encourage celibacy still present? Given that he doesn’t say what those circumstances were, it’s hard to say. He is. . . Read more »

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What is systematic theology & why is it important?

Note: the Alphabet Series of Basement Tapes is now available! Scroll to the bottom of this post for more information. It is an important part of my task as I teach Reformation Bible College students systematic theology to familiarize them with the grammar of our theological conversations. I’m called to introduce them not just to the issues theologians wrestle with, but to the language they use when wrestling with the issues. In the broader evangelical world we have a hard enough time interesting people in any study of theology, let alone adding this rather odd adjective—systematic. The language is as. . . Read more »

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They Labor In Vain, Or a Funny Thing Happened While I Preached My Daughter’s Wedding

Psalm 127 Just a few days ago I was privileged to be able to preach at a rather significant occasion, the wedding ceremony of my first-born. Darby was, like her mother, not just a beautiful and radiant bride, but a diligent, faithful laborer in bringing the event together. When I told her I would like to preach from Psalm 127 I could tell she was a smidge reluctant to give her approval. Perhaps she feared that I would chasten her and her new husband to remember that children are a blessing from the Lord, and I wanted grandbabies, and soon.. . . Read more »

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Phelps, Driscoll, & Gothard

Though I hope you will stick around and see this piece through to the bitter end, I must confess to a bit of bait and switch. You will find precious little in what follows about the death of Fred Phelps, the apology of Mark Driscoll, nor the resignation of Bill Gothard. What you will find is an explanation for why they are in my title but not in my piece. Looking for Approval Like most people I long for approval. Like most people I look for it not only in the wrong places, but with the wrong measuring sticks. The. . . Read more »

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Who’s Your Daddy?

Darkness of the World This past weekend Ligonier Ministries hosted its annual conference, the theme being “Overcoming the World.” I was blessed to hear some amazing preaching, as with every year. Voddie Baucham reminded us of our three great enemies, the world, the flesh and the devil. Robert Godfrey spoke on our call to stand, as our father Athanasius did before us, contra mundum, against the world. We talked about the evils of abortion, the stunning rout of the homosexual lobby is shifting public opinion. I am not leaving the conference, however, squinting to find a silver lining around the. . . Read more »

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Apologetics, Arguments & Walking Toward the Light

Arguing Among Ourselves It is one of my favorite ways to poke at my own tribe. I know exposing the folly of persnickety, precise, and proud, Reformed folk is like shooting Icthus’s in a baptismal barrel, but it needs to be done. In a still smaller circle, that “epistemologically self-conscious,” sub-section of the Reformed that uses such terms as epistemologically self-conscious, we elevate our persnickety-ness, our precision and our pride to Olympian heights. We sit in our armchairs, stroking our beards, tamping our pipes, expositing our syllogisms, while our spiritual flies are down. What I do is run through an. . . Read more »

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How are you dealing with your first born’s impending marriage?

Managing a Large Family Because so few people understand the logistics of managing a large family, and so few know the great genius and diligence of my dear wife, many people at the loss of my wife were most concerned about logistical concerns—how would all the stuff of managing a household get taken care of? The truth is that my dear wife built the railroad, built the engine and stacked the coal. All I have to do is make sure the fire continues to get fed. Now, however, we are soon to lose the platonic ideal of a first born. . . Read more »

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Giving Thanks

Unusual Blessing I am a blessed man. I have wonderful children that love me and each other. I have parents who love me and each other. I have friends nearby, and across the country. I even have friends on every continent. Well, to be scrupulous, I don’t have any penguin friends. But I was reminded the other day to be thankful for a blessing I’ve been given that many have not. The national headquarters for the American Automobile Association is less than five miles from my home. I was driving by their mammoth facility, thinking about how very crowded it. . . Read more »

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If we ask anything in Jesus name, will He really do it?

If you ask anything in My name I will do it? John 14:14 Believing God’s Promises My book, Believing God, was written with a single goal in mind, to help believers enter more fully into the promises of God. Even we who affirm that God’s Word is always true still struggle to believe that if we ask for wisdom He will give it to us (James 1:5), that children are a blessing from the Lord (Psalm 127), that we will be like Him for we shall see Him as He is (I John 3:4). Having pushed for greater faith, greater. . . Read more »

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Fearful Fatherhood

Fatherhood is Difficult We all, I believe, operate under a wide range of unspoken equations. We like our lives marked by ease and peace. We dispatch, without thinking, anything that challenges our ease and peace. At least I do. One of my equations that lurks just beneath the surface is this: if a job is difficult, it’s not my job. Even more accurately, if it’s frightening, it must not be required of me. I have seven children. Each is dependent on me for their provision. I must not provoke them to wrath but must raise them in the nurture and. . . Read more »

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Turning the Other Cheek

Homosexual Agenda Craig James, former football star at SMU, and briefly an sportscaster with Fox Sports, is in court. After his convictions on the nature of marriage, the sin of sexual perversion became known to the network he was fired. And now he has filed a complaint with the Texas Workforce Commission, with help from the Liberty Institute. I share Mr. James’ convictions, without shame or apology. They are nothing more nor less than what the Bible affirms on the issues at hand. I am in turn frustrated and angry at the legal brutality of the homosexual lobby against people. . . Read more »

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What do you think of the movie, Son of God?

Making Images Given that I haven’t seen it, one might think I hadn’t given it much thought. But I have. I could here take a stab at solving the immediate second commandment problem. Some argue that on its face, any movie that depicts Jesus is of necessity a violation of the second commandment which forbids making graven images. It’s a rather sticky wicket given the nuances of our understanding of the incarnation. God, for instance, is spirit. The body of Jesus, while most assuredly in union with God the Son, belongs properly to His human nature. But, an image of. . . Read more »

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Faux Pearls

Maslow was wrong. Well, he was right before he was wrong. It is true enough that we all have a hierarchy of needs. Some things are more important than others. Trouble is, he didn’t know what the most important things were. Foundational in his system are those things necessary for survival, things like food and water. King David had a different, a better perspective. He said that the Lord was His Shepherd, and he shall not want (Psalm 23:1). David, at this point, has no green grass, and no still water. To be sure God does provide these things, but. . . Read more »

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Thieves in the Temple

Rhetoric is a dangerous thing. Not only can we use over the top language to inflame the heart and blur the mind, but perhaps even more often we use soft language to dull the heart and ease the mind. My friends at Babies Are Murdered Here have found their simple message a powerful one not because it is incendiary language, but because it is plain and straightforward language. That it jars on the ear is proof of our own spiritual drowsiness. Thieves in the Government When in the past I have argued that the government is a den of thieves. . . Read more »

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Who is allowed (according to God’s Word) to start a church?

This is such an excellent question, in large part because we live in an age with a profoundly low understanding of the importance and authority of the church. These days otherwise godly people, often dealing with understandable frustrations with their churches, feel no reluctance at all to stay at home, and simply decide to “home church” or, be a church on their own. My concern with such groups is not the nature of the building they use, but their weak understanding of church authority and the need we all have to be under authority. Legitimate Church Authority There are some. . . Read more »

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Soul of the Solas

Five Solas—Alone Together? It puzzles me deeply that so few are puzzled deeply by the paradox. We are so used to the befuddling language that we miss its befuddling nature. It ought to stop us in our tracks and arrest our attention, like those signs I see for Fifth Third Bank. Fifth Bank I could understand. Third Bank I could understand. I could understand them merging to become Fourth Bank. But Fifth Third Bank? What does that even mean? In like manner, how is it that when our spiritual ancestors, our theological heroes, set out to tell us one thing, they. . . Read more »

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A Hero in a Minivan

Like Father, Like Son My eight-year-old son has a heart bigger than his brain. About six months ago I went into his bedroom to turn off his reading light. (The children are given time for reading after bedtime.) There he sat propped up on the top bunk, holding volume one of the Basic Writings of Saint Augustine. “What’re you reading, my son?” I asked him. “The City of God,” he replied nonchalantly. He was far cooler than his bug-eyed father. I had to do some quick thinking. I didn’t want to discourage him, nor to encourage him too much. I. . . Read more »

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The Judge of All the Earth

TV Judgment I have to confess. I’m not saying it was the healthiest thing in the world to do, but boy did we love doing it. It would be evening, the children in bed or playing quietly. I would look across the room at my dear wife. She’d cock an eyebrow, I’d give a sly grin. “You want to?” “Yeah, let’s. Let’s go watch a murder show.” We loved these programs. You know the ones I mean. Keith Morrison would stand before a beautiful log cabin and say, “They had it all. He, a booming business, she children and friends. . . Read more »

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How Well Should Pastors Be Paid?

Should Pastors Be Paid? Before we can answer how well pastors should be paid we first have to establish that they should be paid. The Bible is clear enough on this—see I Timothy 5:17-18 and I Corinthians 9:9-14. Having established that they ought to be paid we have already moved away from the pseudo-gnostic notion that there is something inherently sketchy about it. That is, if we are inclined to think they ought to be paid nothing, we will likely find any payment gross and obscene. Such is envy badly disguised as piety. In principle I am persuaded that a. . . Read more »

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The Kingdom is Now

The Bible is One Book I am deeply grateful to my Old Testament professor. Though I was young and foolish while in seminary, I have, by God’s grace, been growing less young and less foolish over time. I used to argue with him about as often as I now look back with thanks in my heart. He not only taught me how to understand the Old Testament, but at the same time how to understand the Bible. He taught me that the Bible is one book. There are two key elements I learned from him that touch directly on the issue. . . Read more »

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Homeschooling & the Problem of Adam & Eve

Eve’s Problem Husbands, we have a problem, and it has existed from the fall. In the Garden of Eden, right after Adam and Eve sinned, God pronounced judgment. To Eve He said, among other things, “Your desire will be for your husband, And he will rule over you” (Genesis 3:16, NASB). This curse isn’t that the woman will want to be with her husband, but that she will want to be her husband, to rule her husband. It is a two-edged curse. Because the woman was made to be a help to the man and to follow and submit to. . . Read more »

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Strange Bedfellows

Preaching the Gospel at the Gates of Hell All is not actually fair in love and war. And the enemy of my enemy is likely not to be my ally. Two days ago I had the occasion to speak to a group of pro-lifers on ministering outside abortion mills. My desire was to explore how the gospel is what is needed at the gates of hell. I wanted folks to understand we are not there to protest, to affirm, “We oppose what you are doing. We are offended, and we insist you stop.” Neither, however, are we there merely to. . . Read more »

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Knowledge Without Zeal

Diversity in the Body of Christ When Paul, under the inspiration of the Holy Spirit, describes the church as the body of Christ, he speaks more wisely than we fools tend to hear. As is the habit of the modern evangelical church, we take the full, rich, and, indeed, beautiful instructions on how we are to live our lives together for the kingdom and reduce them down to something true but banal, safe, and reasonable. Paul tells us we are the body of Christ, and we hear, “Be nice to each other.” It is a slight improvement if this message reminds. . . Read more »

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Ask RC: Why is it acceptable for the church to change historical doctrines such as condoning birth control?

Perfect Word Because the church can err. The church is the Bride of Christ. He has promised to be with us. He sent His Spirit to guide us, gave His perfect Word to direct us. He is about the business of removing from us every blot and blemish. But that must needs remind us that we have blots and blemishes, that we can and do err. We live in an age that shows little respect for the bride of Christ, even among those who make up the bride of Christ. We are given to autonomy, individualism. We see the church. . . Read more »

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The In Between

Between Remembering & Forgetting There lies not a thin line but a great open plain between remembering and forgetting. This open space is perhaps best called haunting. Yesterday I was driving my thirteen year old back from an orthodontist appointment. What could be more ordinary, more suburban? We waited in our average sedan for the light to turn green when I asked her a question I never would have anticipated when she had been born: When we are sitting here at this light, does it cross your mind that your mother and your sister are buried right over there? This. . . Read more »

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Treasure In, Treasure Out

Written January 2012 Beautiful Home My beautiful wife loved nothing more than to beautify.  She devoted herself to creating a beautiful home. She planted flowers, bushes and trees outside. Inside she hung, placed, painted and etched. Even when she was not well, this was where her heart was. Over the course of the last nine months of her life, most of it spent in sundry hospitals, she watched, I suspect, more Home and Garden Television than all of HGTV’s executives combined. Her pursuit of beauty, however, did not have its end in a pretty house, but in a godly home.. . . Read more »

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What the Heavens Declare

Ample Arguement It never ceases to surprise me what gets people’s dander up. Sometimes it’s the significant, sometimes the petty. But most of the time it’s getting their toes stepped on. I recently walked into a room full of unhappy moms, all aflutter over men with long hair, tattoos, and other trendy trinkets that tar the terminally hip. Battle lines were drawn between the defenders of decency and the defenders of liberty. They were nice to each other, as moms are wont to be, but neither side was taking any prisoners. Finally one wise woman spoke these words, “Does not. . . Read more »

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Here

40 Years of Abortion Debate Rhetoric is a slippery device. Sometimes we use it to obfuscate, sometimes to clarify. Sometimes, however, our attempts to clarify betray us, and we end up obfuscating. For over forty years now Christians have entered into debate on the abortion issue. We brought the wisdom of God’s Word. We brought the latest information from genetics. We brought profound moral philosophers. We wrote learned journal articles, engaged in nuanced debates. We thought we were fighting for life, but is it just possible that the devil was successfully turning our labors into policy conundrums, political fodder, even. . . Read more »

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The Son Rising in the East—Cultural Transformation

The early church faced at least two distinct and competing enemies. While Jesus walked the earth and after, the great challenge to the kingdom of God was found both in the Roman Empire and in Judaism. An armed force that was, though given to emperor worship, essentially secular and a false religion put their differences aside to eradicate a faith built around a King who had been given all authority in heaven and on earth. Coexistence of Peace & Brutality I was reminded of this odd juxtaposition several years ago when I had the opportunity to travel to Burma to. . . Read more »

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Ask RC: What would you want on your tombstone, if you could have only one word?

This “Ask RC” goes back twenty years. It was asked of me by my friend and co-laborer Laurence Windham. Laurence has a preternatural gift of asking what he calls “diagnostic questions,” questions that slip into ordinary conversation that end up, before we know what has happened, exposing our souls. I, having known Laurence for some time, had learned to be on my guard when he asked it. I took a minute or two to think it through and answered this way—“I know what I would want on my tombstone, but I also know what I ought to want on my. . . Read more »

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Ask RC: Does God really decide, and care who wins a football game?

I began asking this question myself long before Tim Tebow was even born. I was a little boy, deeply committed to the Pittsburgh Steelers. I remember praying that they would beat the Oakland Raiders in an upcoming playoff game. When my prayer ended fear set in—what if there were a little boy just like me, somewhere in Oakland, praying that the Raiders would beat the Steelers? My father comforted me by explaining that no real Christian would ever pray for the Raiders. God Decides Everything The truth is God does decide, and He does care. He not only decides who. . . Read more »

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They Can Do Nothing Without Jesus—Help Your Children Live Fruitful Lives

Like basketball’s Boston Celtics or football’s Pittsburgh Steelers, we homeschoolers are, so to speak, a dynasty. Competitively, we dominate. Every year, seemingly, homeschoolers take top honors at the National Spelling Bee, span the globe victoriously at the Geography Bee, and argue our way to statewide forensics titles. We populate the better side of standardized test bell curves. We outlearn, outserve, and outscore every other educational demographic. We needn’t be ashamed of these good things, but they are also dangerous, and we have no reason to be proud. The devil is an equal-opportunity tempter. When things don’t go our way, he. . . Read more »

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Castles in the Sand

What Are We Arguing About? There are, when we disagree, almost always two disagreements. Most of the time the smaller disagreement is the bigger one. Consider election. There are some in the church who believe that God chooses who will believe His gospel. There are others who believe God sees beforehand who will believe. This, on the surface, seems to be the root of the loss of peace between these two groups. The second disagreement, however, is over this question: just how important an issue is this? Though there are surely exceptions, by and large those who don’t believe in election. . . Read more »

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Legalistic Relativism

The appeal of ethical relativism is rather plain to see. If there is no right and wrong then I can’t be convicted of any wrong. Ethical relativism allows me to write my own law, to edit on the fly, to finish “I may do this…” with an unassailable “…because I want to.” Desire becomes its own justification. My will becomes my law. Relative Morality? This appeal, however, soon enough begins to dissipate if we have any interest at all in being coherent, consistent in our thinking. We quickly turn, “I may do this, because I want to” into “You may. . . Read more »

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Ask RC: Why won’t my pastor preach against abortion?

Three Reasons I’ve Heard Here are the three reasons I hear most frequently, and two I suspect. First, I have heard from some pastors that the issue is a political one, and they think it necessary to avoid political issues. Some argue that they avoid political issues because they are divisive, others because the government forbids it. They are right on the first count, wrong on the second. Of course every truth divides. Every truth. Preach “Puppies are cute” and the kitten crowd might get upset. Preach “The sky is blue” and the gloomy brigade will demand to know what. . . Read more »

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A Broken and Contrite Spirit

Clichés don’t just happen to become clichés. They have to earn their stripes—a feat that requires, most of the time, that the principle contained therein has a high truth quotient. We know, for instance, that we ought not to bite the hand that feeds us because we’ve found that such bitten hands tend to stop feeding us. We also wisely teach that “more is caught than taught” because, well, more is caught than taught. Our lives are the most potent form of sermonic interference. Sin & Parenting Homeschooling families experience this peculiar truth more, perhaps, than we would like to.. . . Read more »

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Ask RC: Should Churches Have New Members Classes?

Hebrews tells us that we are to “Obey those who are over you, and be submissive, for they watch out for your souls, as those who must give account. Let them do so with joy and not with grief, for that would be unprofitable for you” (Hebrews 13:17).  We live in an age where church membership is looked upon as unnecessary, or worse, unhelpful. That is a grave danger indeed. When we refuse to submit to a group of local elders we put ourselves beyond the reach of the gracious blessing of church discipline. We are all capable of falling. . . Read more »

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Losing Privileges

Is this a Christian country? There are likely as many ways to answer the question as there are stripes on our flag. Yes, the country was populated at its beginning with Christians looking for a place to worship freely. But that was before we became a country. Yes, many of our founding fathers were sincere professing Christians. But many of them were not. Yes, we are Christian in the same sense as all of Europe is Christian — it is the faith tradition of the majority in our country. But no, we have rejected the faith of our fathers. Yes,. . . Read more »

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Heralding the Good News

It is false to say that what we don’t know can’t hurt us, especially when it comes to the Bible. If ever there were anything we need to know, it is the very Word of God. That said, what is in all likelihood worse than what we don’t know about the Bible is what we do know that just isn’t so. Consider the Great Commission. Go Into All the World This, of course, is something we ought to be infinitely familiar with. These are not just the words of Jesus, as if that weren’t enough, but the “last” words of Jesus,. . . Read more »

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Ask RC: Should we as Christians celebrate the Jewish feasts of the Old Testament?

Without question the most vexing challenge faced by the early church was understanding how believing Jews and believing Gentiles ought to relate to one another. The theme gets major play in Galatians, Hebrews, Acts, and is even the root of the issue that led to Paul’s stern and public rebuke of Peter. That so much time and attention was paid to this issue might incline us to believe it was settled. Or it just may prove how deep runs the temptation to botch this up. Faith & Works Let’s start here — we have peace with God by trusting in. . . Read more »

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Losing the Fruit for the Trees

I’ve been thinking through, and nailing down my strategy for the coming year, and for the years after that. It has four parts. Pursue growth in grace and wisdom.  It is wisdom to remember that progress in this life is nothing more nor less than becoming more like Jesus. When I wake up each morning this ought to be my holy passion, when I lie down my most fervent prayer. The fruit of the Spirit, happily, is self-perpetuating. That is, the more I live for love, joy, peace, patience, the more satisfied I am with love, joy, peace, patience, and. . . Read more »

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Someone is Wrong on the Internet

It takes two to tango, and that doesn’t even include the band. Our choices, our behaviors, are rarely as discreet as we think they are. Not only do our decisions bleed into our other decisions, they touch on other people’s lives, more often than not. No man is an island; neither is any man a peninsula. Cyber Gossip First, consider gossip. If gossip is spoken in the woods and no one hears, does it still make a mess? Guarding our tongues is important. But we need to guard our ears as well. Without an audience, gossip dies on the vine. It. . . Read more »

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Ask RC: Why is your new church plant called Ascension Presbyterian Church?

As with when I started Saint Peter Presbyterian Church in 1996, I recognize that I don’t have the freedom to name a church all by my lonesome. I did, however, in both cases, bring a suggestion to the gathered core group. In both instances, my suggestion carried the day. The church, which begins to meet for worship January 5, is called Presbyterian Church because I believe in honesty in labeling. That is, we are both Presbyterian and a church. We are ruled by elders, and are connected to a broader denomination for accountability. We are a church in the sense. . . Read more »

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Ask RC: Can a person who has committed suicide go to heaven?

Yes. Heaven is not a place for those who did not sin. It is a place for those whose sins are covered by the blood of Christ. The question, however, is understandable for at least three reasons. Is suicide unforgiveable? First, murder is a most grievous sin. Once we get past the common evangelical error that all sins are equally wicked (see an earlier piece here) we recognize that murder will surely be one of the biggest sins. After all, we are told those who practice these things will not see the kingdom of heaven (Gal. 5:21). That said, however,. . . Read more »

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Pleasures Forevermore

“Two things I ask of you; deny them not to me before I die: Remove far from me falsehood and lying; give me neither poverty nor riches; feed me with the food that is needful for me, lest I be full and deny you and say, ‘Who is the Lord?’ or lest I be poor and steal and profane the name of my God.” So the wisdom of Agur, found in Proverbs 30, reminds us. Though sin knows no tax brackets — the poor can be greedy and the rich envious — peculiar circumstances tend to produce peculiar temptations. Agur fears. . . Read more »

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Dr. R.C. Sproul, Jr.

Dr. R.C. Sproul, Jr..

Dr. R.C. Sproul Jr. is a graduate of Reformed Theological Seminary, and Grove City College. He received his Doctorate of Ministry in 2001 and is Founder, Chairman and Teacher of Highlands Ministries.
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